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Expanding the Workstation Experience to More Knowledge Workers

first_imgOn January 7, Intel, Fujitsu, HP, Lenovo, NEC and other Intel channel providers introduced a new entry-level workstation that successfully broadened workstation appeal to users who may have been purchasing consumer and business desktop computers.  This new workstation, based on Intel® Core™ i5 processors or Intel® Xeon® processor 3400 series and the Intel® 3450 chipset, delivers a workstation experience at near desktop prices.If you are employing your workstation for 2D drafting and detailing then this new workstation with integrated Intel® HD Graphics may be an ideal and economical solution. Together with industry-leading 2D CAD applications like AutoCAD LT, this new workstation provides a comprehensive set of tools that will help you accurately and efficiently create, document and share drawings.  It will also give you access to a workstation platform built around the efficiency, power and reliability demanded of a professional workstation product.Designing in 3D is here to stay, so why not use a workstation that is designed and optimized to deliver a basic 3D design experience that engineers demand? Why not provide management with an effective and affordable system that allows you to quickly and accurately manipulate part models at an interactive pace?It’s all possible—today. Intel® Core™ i5 processors or Intel® Xeon® processor 3400 series combined with the Intel® 3450 chipset deliver real workstation features that provide a stable and reliable platform to create your designs on.“The design goal of this category was to deliver features, functions and performance of an entry workstation at a more affordable price point,” said Tony Neal Graves, General Manager of workstation technology in the Intel Architecture Group.  “This new workstation category is intended to help SMB and Enterprise businesses extend the workstation product promise to more of their high value knowledge workers who create digital assets for their company.”“Entry level workstations with the new Intel Core i5 processors and Intel Graphics HD are optimal for drafting applications” said Guri Stark, vice president of AutoCAD and Platform Products at Autodesk.  “Our AutoCAD LT users now have access to affordable workstation technology that will help them accurately and productively create, document, and share their drawings.””With its new integrated HD graphics technology, Intel Core I5 workstations give Adobe professional video users an opportunity to quickly and effectively create dynamic content” said Dave Helmly, North American TechSales Manager for Adobe professional Dynamic Media products.  “And, at a new compelling price point, the workstation will help Adobe users make their workstation more capable to keep up with their creativity.”last_img read more

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Best of Cloud Computing Technology from 2011

first_imgThis year marked huge accomplishments for the progression of Cloud computing. From introducing Intel’s Cloud Vision 2015 to celebrating Open Data Center Alliance’s one year anniversary, it was a huge year for Cloud. As we approach a new year, let’s reminisce on all of the biggest and most popular topics that surrounded Cloud computing in 2011.We Read:Usage Models and Technology by Billy CoxFacebook + Open Data Center Alliance: What’s not to love (Or should I say like)? By Raejeanne SkillernCloud Computing Strategy: It’s all for Naught if the Dogs Won’t Eat by Bob DeutscheHybrid cloud – Are you Ready? By Billy CoxIntel IT’s cloud road map challenges and solutions ahead by Ajay Chandramouly Is Virtualization the “foundation” to cloud computing? By Jake SmithFundamental Truths of Enterprise Cloud Strategy by Bob DeutscheHow to effectively manage identity in a cloud environment by Bruno DominguesWe Watched:In Intel’s Cloud Vision 2015, Intel and its partners explain how they are working to develop cloud computing infrastructure and architecture to meet increasing requirements of cloud. With Cloud vision 2015, Intel describes plans to take the data center to the next level and delivering secure, energy efficient hardware and services to move the cloud for the next four years. Deciding to move to the cloud can be a difficult process. Save hours reading the documentation and learn if configuring a private cloud is the right thing to do to manage your resources by watching Intel Cloud Builders Reference Architecture: How to Configure the Cloud. This video features a thematic animation with technical tips and live configuration samples.We Listened:In our chip chat on Open Data Center Usage Models with Raejeanne Skillern, we talked about how the developments of cloud computing and data center technology advancements make open standards a necessity.We also heard from Intel’s Alan Priestley, Cloud Director for EMEA, as he discussed cloud security and the importance of building trust from Client to Cloud.As we start the new year, we look forward to what’s to come for Cloud computing!  What are your predictions? Let us know what you think the future holds for cloud computing, and comment below!For the latest on cloud computing news and technology follow @IntelITSlast_img read more

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Bridging Advanced Analytics and Artificial Intelligence with BigDL

first_imgCo-authored by Radhika Rangarajan, ‎Senior Engineering Program Manager, Big Data Technologies at IntelArtificial intelligence (AI) plays a central role in today’s smart and connected world and is continuously driving the need for scalable, distributed big data analytics with deep learning capabilities. While interest surges in AI, organizations with solutions based on Big Data and Analytics are looking to leverage their existing investment to drive deeper insight. This is now technically possible thanks to an Intel open source effort called BigDL.BigDL (Deep Learning)Opens in a new window is a new open source project from Intel’s Software and Services Group whose vision was to merge two paths of learning capabilities for those building on Apache Spark on the Intel platform. The two paths include traditional distributed analytics with optimized deep learning, to give organizations more ways to derive insights and build solutions. First, we’ll discuss the paths; then explain what the bridge is and how it’s changing things.The Big Data path has largely been about storing and accessing massive amounts of data. The attendant technologies distribute the data across many low-cost systems and provide a mechanism to access it a chunk at a time and consolidate the results. Hadoop*, with its distributed file system, and Apache Spark*, which enables fast in-memory processing across a large cluster of systems, are widely applied by data scientists to store and access data for analysis.Data also drives machine learning. Applications are trained by having them ingest mountains of data to detect patterns based on models created to predict outcomes. But the focus has been on processor-intensive machine learning apps that run on large, specialized systems in the data center.BigDL (see Figure 1) —a newly released open source project from Intel —is a distributed deep learning framework for Apache Spark that ties distributed data access and processing together with emerging deep learning solutions. It lets developers write deep learning applications as standard Spark programs that run on top of existing Spark or Hadoop clusters to put deep learning workloads more directly in touch with the data they use. BigDL uses the Intel® Math Kernel Library and multi-threaded programming in each Spark task. It can run orders of magnitude faster than out-of-the-box Caffe*, Torch*, or TensorFlow* models on a single-node Intel® Xeon® processor. That’s performance comparable with mainstream GPUs but scalable across many general-purpose systems.BigDL ImplementationSo what can you do with BigDL?Leverage existing Spark and Hadoop clusters to run machine learning workloads. In addition to running apps developed with the BigDL framework, BigDL lets you load pre-trained models developed with Caffe or Torch into Spark programs, so you can develop and train in Caffe or Torch and deploy on Spark.Dramatically improve the scalability of machine learning apps by distributing the processing across many more nodes and putting more of the processing where the data is.Add deep learning functions to analytics applications or workflows to enable them to do even more.It’s these things together that make possible new breakthrough applications. For example, advanced analytics and AI are already enabling faster, more accurate medical diagnoses. Think how we might improve that when we can add machine learnings from millions of medical images. And there are similar opportunities in almost every field to take what’s being achieved with analytics and use machine learning to extend and enhance it.It’s not just the sharing of technology, BigDL enables the exporting of AI expertise to data scientists now working across thousands of applications in hundreds of fields. And BigDL is the latest example of Intel’s commitment to open source as the way to democratize AI and enable more people to apply it in more applications.If you’re looking to leverage your business or organization or just want to learn more, visit the BigDL GitHub repositoryOpens in a new window. In addition to the software and documentation, we’re providing a set of tutorials and examples that can help get projects off the ground quickly. And stay tuned, we’ll soon have BigDL information and training incorporated into the Intel® NervanaTM AI AcademyOpens in a new window.For all those who wisely committed down the path of building on Apache Spark on the Intel platform, BigDL now extends the possibilities into deep learning, enabling more flexibility when driving insights.last_img read more

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The New Carbon Protest: Refusing to Live in Coal-Powered Dorm

first_imgActivists in polar bear suits or protesters standing outside of coal plants might get the public message on climate change across, but might there be more personal choices that activists can make to convey their point? Say, instead of protesting the use of coal power, why not refuse to use it?The newest wrinkle in the grassroots climate change movement is out of Boston, where students in a group calling itself the Leadership Campaign have pledged to regularly hold “sleepouts” in tents instead of sleeping inside dorms whose electricity comes from coal plants. Last night, students and NASA scientist James Hansen were among several dozen roused from tents they had illegally pitched on the Boston Common, the park which sits in the center of the city. The Campaign explains its action: Beginning October 25, students, religious leaders and community members from across the Commonwealth will refuse to sleep in their homes and dorms powered by dirty energy until the state adopts a policy to Repower Massachusetts with 100% Clean Electricity in the next 10 years, transforming our economy and eliminating dirty fossil fuels.Students elsewhere in the state are joining in, the group says.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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NIH Wants to Hear About Genetic Tests

first_imgKathy Hudson has been worrying about the quality of genetic tests for years, and now—after becoming chief of staff to National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins—she’s doing something about it. More than 1600 genetic tests are on the market, and there aren’t enough regulations to ensure that they’re scientifically sound. To make things easier on consumers, and help scientists keep track, NIH is launching a new online registry that asks gene testing companies to volunteer information on studies they’ve conducted on their products. “Finally, there’s action,” Hudson said in an interview with ScienceInsider. The Genetic Testing Registry will be run by the National Library of Medicine. A big advantage of this is that information on specific tests can be linked to other library resources, such as images of a DNA variant’s location in the genome, or papers published on a particular disease susceptibility marker. The result, Hudson hopes, will “be a wonderfully rich resource for physicians and patients and researchers.” Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) As genetic tests have multiplied, concern has grown that oversight is lacking. That’s because many gene tests are considered “laboratory developed tests,” which get less scrutiny from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration than those developed as “test kits.” Regulations for genetic tests are evolving, and it’s sometimes not clear whether a particular test falls into FDA’s bailiwick or not. Hudson once pressed for a mandatory registry, but admits it’s not clear whether NIH has the authority to require that companies submit data on their tests. Even without that, she hopes the registry will push the industry as a whole to enhance test quality, because peer pressure might encourage companies to submit to the database. The NIH plan was discussed last month at a private meeting of NIH institute directors. There, some voiced concerns, including whether running a registry might be “burdensome” for the agency, according to meeting minutes that were released, and be misconstrued as NIH providing “brand endorsement” of the tests listed. Hudson says that the registry will include a disclaimer that NIH isn’t backing the data submitted-much like another registry it currently houses, clinicaltrials.gov. She doubts that hosting this new registry will be much trouble. “It’s puny,” says Hudson, compared to the vast warehouses of data, such as those in genomics, already managed by the agency. Correction: This article originally stated that many genetic tests are considered test kits, and that these get less scrutiny from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration than those developed in a lab.  In fact, test kits get more scrutiny, but many genetic tests are considered “laboratory developed tests” and receive less scrutiny before going on the market.last_img read more

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If Earth never had life, continents would be smaller

first_imgVIENNA—It may seem counterintuitive, but life on Earth, even with all the messy erosion it creates, keeps continents growing. Presenting here this week at the annual meeting of the European Geosciences Union, researchers say it’s the erosion itself that makes the difference in continental size. Plant life, for example, can root its way through rock, breaking rocks into sediment. The sediments, like milk-dunked cookies, carry liquid water in their pores, which allows more water to be recycled back into Earth’s mantle. If not enough water is present in the mantle about 100 to 200 km deep to keep things flowing, continental production decreases. The authors built a planetary evolution model to show how these processes relate and found that if continental weathering and erosion rates decreased, at first the continents would remain large. But over time, if life never evolved on Earth, not enough water would make its way to the mantle to help produce more continental crust, and whatever continents there were would then shrink. Now, continents cover 40% of the planet. Without life, that coverage would shrink to 30%. In a more extreme case, if life never existed, the continents might only cover 10% of Earth. When it comes to a habitable planet, life even plays a role in building the habitats.last_img read more

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Cardiologist nominated to be next FDA chief

first_imgPresident Barack Obama has nominated a veteran heart researcher who has run numerous large clinical trials to be the next head of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Robert Califf, currently FDA’s deputy commissioner for medical products and tobacco, was a top administrator and researcher at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, for more than 30 years before coming to FDA earlier this year. If confirmed by the Senate, Califf would succeed Margaret Hamburg, who stepped down this past March.Califf, 63, “has long been considered a likely candidate for the top FDA job,” Brady Dennis reports in The Washington Post. “He has led scores of pivotal clinical trials, been among the nation’s most cited medical authors and for years served on various FDA advisory committees.”Reaction to the 15 September White House announcement has been positive. “Great news!,” tweeted Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)”He’s thoughtful and personable, and I’m sure will be a strong advocate on behalf of the FDA during a very critical period,” Aaron Kesselheim of Harvard Medical School told the Associated Press.Califf is “a soft-spoken Southerner with a passion for improving clinical trials,” and extensive knowledge of industry, Nature’s Heidi Ledford reported earlier this year.Califf’s confirmation is not assured. Numerous Obama administration nominees have never received confirmation votes, and many have bowed out of the process after waiting a year or more for Senate action.last_img read more

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Spat threatens China’s plans to build world’s largest telescope

first_img China’s astronomers are united in wanting a world-class giant optical telescope, one that would serve notice that they are ready to compete on the global stage. But a squabble has opened up over the telescope’s design. On one side is an established engineering team, led by a veteran optics expert responsible for the nation’s largest existing telescope, that is eager to push ahead with an ambitious design. On the other are astronomers reveling in a grassroots priority-setting exercise—unprecedented for China—who have doubts about the ambitious design and favor something simpler.Now, a panel of international experts has reviewed the designs and come out squarely in favor of the simpler proposal, according to a copy of the review obtained by Science. But the conclusion has not ended what one Chinese astronomer calls “an epic battle” between the high-ranking engineers accustomed to top-down control over projects and the nascent grassroots movement.At issue is a project that emerged in 2015, when the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) set up a Center for Astronomical Mega-Science that polled senior astronomers on their priorities. Top was a desire to boost China’s participation in the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT), which is being developed by an international consortium. (Construction on Hawaii’s Mauna Kea has been delayed by legal claims raised by Native Hawaiians.) Second was a giant telescope of the country’s own.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)For now, China’s largest optical telescope is the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST), a 4-meter survey telescope completed in 2008 in Hebei province near Beijing. China’s astronomers rallied around the idea of leapfrogging to a 12-meter telescope that, if completed quickly before other giants like the TMT, would for some years be the largest telescope on Earth. In early 2016, the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC), responsible for funding large domestic projects, gave the megascience center approval to develop plans for what is now being called the Large Optical/Infrared Telescope (LOT), to be sited in western China. To secure NDRC funding for construction—an estimated 1.5 billion renminbi ($220 million)—the plans must be approved by the end of 2018.Xiangqun Cui was ready. An optics specialist, Cui heads a group at CAS’s Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology (NIAOT) that had developed LAMOST and was already working on a 12-meter telescope design.In most large telescopes, a large primary mirror captures light and reflects it off one or two secondary mirrors to the telescope’s instruments. The daring NIAOT design calls for four mirrors—one primary and three secondary. The fourth mirror allows for exquisite control of the streams of photons so that they fall almost perpendicular to the instrument’s focal plane, ensuring “very good image quality,” Cui says. She adds that, because the TMT and other telescopes would eventually surpass the LOT’s sensitivity, the NIAOT design needed to provide a wide field of view that would enable the telescope to act as a spotter for the bigger scopes. “This is a new century, we need new optical systems,” Cui says.In an unusual step, the megascience center set up meetings, working groups, and a science advisory committee to solicit input from the wider astronomical community—”a first for Chinese astronomy,” says Johannes Andersen, an astronomer at the University of Copenhagen. Astronomers who took part expressed concerns with the NIAOT design. “I found many scientific and engineering issues,” says Donglin Ma, an optics scientist at Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), in Wuhan, China.One concern centers on the four-mirror design. Many astronomers fear the additional mirror will degrade sensitivity, or the ability to see faint objects, because photons are lost with each reflection. Cui counters that a new mirror coating developed in the United States promises 98% reflectivity. “There will be no problem” with the additional mirror, she says.A second point of contention is how quickly the scope can shift from a wide-field survey mode to one that would focus on transient phenomena, such as gamma ray bursts and supernovae. With the complexity of the NIAOT design, astronomers worry the shift would be slow.Finally, the astronomers want proven technology that will work reliably from the start. They note that LAMOST has fallen short of its primary goal: observing faint galaxies beyond the Milky Way. Cui says the issue is not with the telescope, but with increasing dust and humidity at the site, which now gets only 120 clear nights a year, down from more than 200 when LAMOST was being planned.After reviewing the NIAOT design, Ma formed a group that began developing a rival design with just two secondary mirrors. The HUST team has received advice from outsiders like Jerry Nelson of the Lick Observatory at the University of California, Santa Cruz, an applied physicist who led the design of the 10-meter Keck telescopes in Hawaii and was the TMT project scientist. “We will be involved as consultants for the telescope and instruments to the extent we are asked,” says Nelson, who passed away last week. But Cui, a senior scientist and CAS academician, refused to back down.To resolve the impasse, the megascience center had an international panel weigh the two alternatives. The nine-member panel, led by Andersen, met in Beijing on 19 and 20 April. Their report, which has been circulated among key personnel but not publicly released, firmly sides with advocates of a simpler design. It calls the mirror coating proposed by the NIAOT team “not yet proven technology” and says that atmospheric turbulence would prevent the image quality in the NIAOT design from living up to hopes. It also says that the telescope would have a hard time switching quickly between surveys and targeting transient objects.The panel report concludes that the NIAOT optical system “cannot compete” with more standard designs like the HUST approach, “in terms of meeting scientific objectives, providing operational flexibility and keeping within a limited budget.” With the panel’s recommendation in hand, the megascience center board decided on 19 May to proceed with the HUST design.Cui is now reportedly lobbying CAS for a second review. But some astronomers are confident CAS will leave the matter in the hands of the megascience team. “We think the debate is over,” says Suijian Xue, a vice director of CAS’s National Astronomical Observatories in Beijing. He says that getting everyone to work on optimizing the three-mirror system is “the only way to unite the entire community.” He also hopes that the bottom-up process the megascience center followed will set a precedent that will help future science projects avoid clashes. Spat threatens China’s plans to build world’s largest telescope By Dennis NormileJun. 14, 2017 , 10:00 AMlast_img read more

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Medicine Nobel honors work on cellular system to sense oxygen levels

first_img G. Yuan et al., “Protein kinase G–regulated production of H2S governs oxygen sensing,” Science Signaling 8, 373 (21 Apr 2015) J. Marx, “How Cells Endure Low Oxygen,” Science 303, 5663 (05 Mar 2004) J. W. Bullen et al., “Protein kinase A–dependent phosphorylation stimulates the transcriptional activity of hypoxia-inducible factor 1,” Science Signaling 9, 430 (31 May 2016) G. Yuan et al., “H2S production by reactive oxygen species in the carotid body triggers hypertension in a rodent model of sleep apnea,” Science Signaling 9, 441 (16 Aug 2016) One of these, roxadustat, was approved in China in 2018 for the treatment of anemia in people with chronic kidney disease. And even before that, two cyclists were suspended for using the substance to enhance their performance by boosting red blood cell production.Celeste Simon, a cellular biologist at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, says it is hard to overestimate the role hypoxia plays in disease. “Oxygen limitation is a part of virtually all diseases, not just solid tumors or stroke, but inflammation, wound healing, peripheral arterial disease. All of these involve decreased oxygen.” She says one of the main goals of the field now is to show that the knowledge can be used to help patients.“There’s HIF in virtually every cell of the body, in the nervous system, in the blood vessels, the immune system,” notes Johnson, who also has a lab at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom. Its role in the immune system may turn out to be particularly critical, he says, because immune cells invade inflamed tissue, which is usually hypoxic. But it also means that any manipulation of HIF will have numerous effects. “These drugs that influence the hypoxia pathway will be very powerful, but they will also have to be looked at very carefully,” Johnson says.A 2004 feature in Science covered much of the history of prize-winning work. And in a feature just last month, Science visited a mountaintop city to explore how low oxygen levels ravage the body.“Believe it or not, this has been a really lousy year for me,” Semenza surprisingly noted at the start of a press conference in Baltimore this morning, explaining that he had fallen down stairs in May and broken his neck. (A Hopkins neurosurgeon handled his care and he has few problems resultings from the fall.) On a lighter note, Semenza added that he didn’t wake up fast enough to answer the first phone call from the Nobel Committee. “I’m a deep sleeper.”Ratcliffe, who also has a position at the Francis Crick Institute in London, was racing to finish a grant application when he got the news, according to a tweet from the Nobel Committee. M. Ivan et al., “HIFα Targeted for VHL-Mediated Destruction by Proline Hydroxylation: Implications for O2 Sensing,” Science 292, 5516 (20 Apr 2001) G. L. Semenza, “Life with Oxygen,” Science 318, 5847 (05 Oct 2007) M. E. Hubbi et al., “A Nontranscriptional Role for HIF-1α as a Direct Inhibitor of DNA Replication,” Science Signaling 6, 262 (12 Feb 2013) P. Jaakkola et al., “Targeting of HIF-α to the von Hippel-Lindau Ubiquitylation Complex by O2-Regulated Prolyl Hydroxylation,” Science 292, 5516 (20 Apr 2001) “Grant proposal deadlines wait for no-one!”Sir Peter Ratcliffe sitting at his desk working on his EU Synergy Grant application, after learning he had been awarded this year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.Photographer: Catherine King pic.twitter.com/np0ty6SLi9— The Nobel Prize (@NobelPrize) October 7, 2019 Related content from News from ScienceM. Enserink, “Hypoxia city,” Science (12 Sep 2019) N. Masson et al., “Conserved N-terminal cysteine dioxygenases transduce responses to hypoxia in animals and plants,” Science 365, 6448 (05 Jul 2019) JONATHAN NACKSTRAND/AFP via Getty Images center_img Y. A. Minamishima et al., “Reactivation of Hepatic EPO Synthesis in Mice After PHD Loss,” Science 329, 5990 (23 Jul 2010) Nobel Assembly member Randall Johnson (far right) announces the winners of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: Gregg Semenza, Peter Ratcliffe, and William Kaelin Jr. When oxygen levels are low (hypoxia), HIF-1alpha is protected from degradation and accumulates in the nucleus, where it associates with ARNT and binds to specific DNA sequences (HRE) in hypoxia-regulated genes (1). At normal oxygen levels, HIF-1alpha is rapidly degraded by the proteasome (2). Oxygen regulates the degradation process by the addition of hydroxyl groups (OH) to HIF-1alpha (3). The VHL protein can then recognize and form a complex with HIF-1alpha leading to its degradation in an oxygen-dependent manner (4). The three new Nobel laureates are William Kaelin Jr. at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Peter Ratcliffe of the University of Oxford, and Gregg Semenza of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland. The Nobel Committee praised the trio for “for their discoveries of how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)In the 1980s scientists already knew that low oxygen levels increased transcription of the gene for EPO in the kidney, which in turn boosted production of oxygen-carrying red blood cells. But how the body sensed a lack of oxygen was unclear.In 1992, Semenza pinpointed a protein he called hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). It binds to the regulatory region of the EPO gene when there is little oxygen. HIF is made up of two parts: HIF-1alpha and HIF-1beta (or ARNT). Only HIF-1alpha senses oxygen directly and Semenza, Ratcliffe, and Kaelin showed how in independent lines of research: Under normal oxygen conditions, two amino acids of the HIF-1alpha protein are chemically modified by enzymes called prolyl hydroxylases. The modified HIF-1alpha can then bind to a protein called VHL and that complex is tagged for destruction in the cell’s garbage disposal, the proteasome.Under low oxygen conditions, however, the enzymes that chemically modify HIF-1alpha become inactive. Instead of binding to VHL and being destroyed, HIF-1alpha migrates to the cell’s nucleus, where it unites with HIF-1beta and binds to certain parts of the genome, regulating transcription of hundreds of genes including the one for EPO.Kaelin, a cancer researcher, came into the topic by researching an inherited syndrome, von Hippel-Lindau disease, that increases the risks of certain cancers. It’s caused by mutations in the gene for VHL and Kaelin found that cancer cells lacking the protein turn on hypoxia-related genes.The cancer connections to this oxygen sensing system have only expanded. Some of the genes controlled by HIF are used by tumor cells to produce blood vessels to nourish themselves, others directly act on cell proliferation or metastasis. Several compounds that inhibit HIF-1alpha or the closely related HIF-2alpha are being tested in clinical trials to treat cancer patients. Another class of drugs inhibits the enzymes that modify HIF. (They are called HIF prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors.) Medicine Nobel honors work on cellular system to sense oxygen levels The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to three scientists for their research into how cells detect oxygen and react to hypoxia—conditions when oxygen is low in tissues. The fundamental physiology work has led to a better understanding of how more than 300 genes in the body are regulated, including the one for the hormone erythropoietin (EPO), which controls the production of red blood cells.Oxygen sensing is integral to many diseases and numerous drugs are being developed to alter the response of this system to treat everything from cancer to anemia. “Applications of these findings are already beginning to affect how medicine is practiced,” Randall Johnson of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, who studies hypoxia and was on the prize selection committee, said in a press conference announcing the winners.“How oxygen is sensed by both normal tissues and tumors is an incredibly important discovery that is highly deserving of a Nobel Prize,” says Amato Giaccia, a cancer researcher at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. “It’s a fundamental aspect of nature.” Many of the genes that are turned on when oxygen is scarce are also turned on in tumor cells, he notes. Related content from Science, Science Signaling, and Science Translational Medicine H. E. Nicholson et al., “HIF-independent synthetic lethality between CDK4/6 inhibition and VHL loss across species,” Science Signaling 12, 601 (01 Oct 2019) A. A. Chakraborty et al., “HIF activation causes synthetic lethality between the VHL tumor suppressor and the EZH1 histone methyltransferase,” Science Translational Medicine 9, 398 (12 Jul 2017) By Kai KupferschmidtOct. 7, 2019 , 6:00 AM A. A. Chakraborty et al., “Histone demethylase KDM6A directly senses oxygen to control chromatin and cell fate,” Science 363, 6432 (15 Mar 2019) Courtesy Karolinska Institute last_img read more

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Line-ups: Sampdoria v Atalanta

first_imgAtalanta are forced to make changes with Papu Gomez and Luis Muriel leading the way against Fabio Quagliarella’s Sampdoria. It kicks off at the Stadio Luigi Ferraris at 14.00 GMT. You can follow all the build-up and action as it happens from today’s SIX Serie A games on the LIVEBLOG. Gian Piero Gasperini’s men are finding it difficult to balance their Champions League commitments with domestic affairs, but did get their first ever point in the tournament this week, holding Manchester City to a 1-1 draw. That came just days after a 2-0 Serie A home defeat to Cagliari, which allowed the Sardinians and Lazio to catch them in joint fourth place. Josip Ilicic was sent off for a reaction foul and he begins his two-match ban, with Duvan Zapata still out injured. Ruslan Malinovskyi, Robin Gosens and Remo Freuler are not 100 per cent fit either. Papu Gomez and former Sampdoria striker Muriel lead the attack, with Malinovskyi gritting his teeth to play on in the trequartista role. Sampdoria are fresh off their first win under Claudio Ranieri, squeezing past SPAL in the final minutes, a result that allowed them to leave the foot of the table. Last year’s Capocannoniere Fabio Quagliarella has support from Federico Bonazzoli rather than Manolo Gabbiadini. It’s a special game for Emiliano Rigoni, who had six miserable months on loan with Atalanta last season before he was sent back to Zenit St Petersburg early. Sampdoria: Audero; Bereszynski, Ferrari, Colley, Murru; Depaoli, Ekdal, Vieira, Jankto; Bonazzoli, Quagliarella Atalanta: Gollini; Toloi, Palomino, Djimsiti; Hateboer, De Roon, Pasalic, Castagne; Malinovskyi; Gomez, Muriel Watch Serie A live in the UK on Premier Sports for just £11.99 per month including live LaLiga, Eredivisie, Scottish Cup Football and more. Visit: https://subscribe.premiersports.tv/last_img read more

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Champions League XI nominees

first_img Watch Serie A live in the UK on Premier Sports for just £11.99 per month including live LaLiga, Eredivisie, Scottish Cup Football and more. Visit: https://subscribe.premiersports.tv/ Cristiano Ronaldo, Matthijs de Ligt, Kalidou Koulibaly, Fabian Ruiz and Italy international Jorginho are all nominated for the UEFA Champions League Team of the Year. It is the 16th consecutive season in which CR7 has been nominated. He is joined on the list of nominees by his new teammate Mattijs de Ligt, who arrived at the Allianz Stadium after a phenomenal run to the semi-finals in the last Champions League campaign. Napoli, who have never had a player in the all-star XI, have got two players among the list of 50 nominees. Kalidou Koulibaly, who is also the tallest players on the list, is joined by Spanish midfielder Fabian Ruiz. Ronaldo has made the ideal XI in each of the last 12 seasons, leading Lionel Messi who has made the final team 10 times and is nominated for the 14th time. Italy international and former Napoli player Jorginho has also been nominated for the Team of the Year through his performances at Chelsea, helping them to win the Europa League last season. It means he has earned his spot on this 50-man shortlist purely for this season’s games.last_img read more